Review: DIY Tribe – workshop and sewing kits

We were recently at the Green Gathering festival where The DIY Tribe came and gave some sewing workshops.

Jo was friendly and engaging, the children taking part in our camping group were aged between 5 and 10 and all came with us. Though there were adults and teens at the same session not in our group also enjoying themselves. The session was well prepped in terms of plan, supply of equipment and materials and back ups. If anyone was struggling Jo was attentive and encouraging in the way she approached helping them. She was also flexible to the members of the group who wanted to go in their own artistic direction (and come up with their own designs).

If I had an event where a workshop of this nature was suitable/required, I would not hesitate in asking for The DIY Tribe. More information about the workshops here.

The children were very excited to bring home their makes. They absolutely loved that it was “real sewing, stabby needles and all” instead of the “babyish needle sewing” they have in kits from friends and family. In fact, when I told them we had kits at home, from The DIY Tribe that I had previously got, they were very excited.

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The kits at home

The excitement from the workshop didn’t disappear when we got home. In fact, even though they have now completed their kits at home they are still very fired up in terms of creativity.

The kits came in very cute and neatly packaged little boxes, with the loose materials tied inside the main piece of fabric and then a good quality embroidery hoop, real needle and some paper instructions complete with templates. The kits are designed so that the children have a more real world experience of a sewing project; aside from having collect the materials (it’s all provided) they have to do everything from cutting templates right through to pinning the cut outs to the fabric to sew. All of the preparation is done by them. The only thing you need to add to the kit is a pair of scissors.

The kits are aged at 8+. Aged a little above and a little below that age with motor difficulties a little guidance was required (mostly help with knots) and they both pricked themselves (and me) a ton… but it’s all part of the development and learning process and left us all in giggles. No tears were shed. It was definitely suitable to both of their needs, they just both needed differing levels of support to complete it.

They loved watching their kits slowly evolving into their own little masterpiece and you could see the sense of pride and achievement grow with each stage. It also helped Logan, who’s very much a “I want it finished yesterday” kind of boy in understanding somewhat that sometimes it takes time to achieve what you want to achieve. But the level of difficulty in this kit means the end goal is attainable, though still has an element of challenge (in a positive-learning experience kind of way). And the different materials and stitches required meant that it wasn’t all just the same old technique which made it more fun.

 

In all it took about 1 hour to complete their projects (around 10 minutes prep, 40 minutes making time and 10 minutes clear up). The children are very proud of what they have achieved and cannot wait to frame their projects ready to present them to their grandparents for Christmas (yes, we are collecting our projects through the year to give to the grandparents for Christmas – so Grandparents, we hope you are not reading this).

More information about the kits can be found here.

NB. This is a genuine review. At the time of writing Jo and The DIY Tribe have no idea that this blog even exists (to my knowledge) let alone that they’d be reviewed.

 

Review: Creatimber wobble board

Having been thinking about a wobble board for a long long time, I was confused as to whether one would be big enough, last long enough, be useful, be strong enough, help or hinder the developmental weaknesses experienced here. I am never worried about spending money on something if I know it’s going to get used and would have a purpose or have the potential to help. I just don’t want to waste money, or even space, by buying lots of stuff we don’t need.

After a family member had one of the Wobbel branded ones, I realised that size and use wouldn’t be an issue. But still unsure of whether it’d get much use, I was reluctant to spend out the prices. I am not at all put off by the quality of their products, I have seen them and they have a good finish, I just don’t want to spend that much and then the children not use it. And then a friend said something about their Creatimber.  Which was lower in price enough for me to think “ok we’ll try one”. We opted to have one with no felt backing as we are carpeted throughout, so it should be fine.

 

 

So, our experience. Well, its quality means it is both heavy and solid (so dropping it on your toe is not advisable – it will hurt, there will be tears). But the usage. No question. The children were encouraged to use it “however they saw fit” and the uses we have had so far:

  • wobbling side to side from
    • standing
    • seated
    • crouched/crawling position
  • as a boat
  • as a bridge to walk over (upturned)
  • a tunnel to crawl under (upturned)
  • a stage (upturned)
  • a role play shop display (upturned)
  • walking lentghways from one end to the other as it curves around
  • a very unsuccessful, but highly humorous see saw (big gaps in weight difference, hasn’t worked out yet, but some spectacular dismounts)
  • as a hill (upturned)
  • as an object to bounce bouncy balls off
  • as an obstacle in a course both ways

And this doesn’t even begin to consider the variations of each of those listed (the extra toys they have brought into it, the games they have made out of it. It is definitely worth the investment, it’ll definitely get used here, and we’d definitely recommend to others. The wobble board was shipped from Budapest, and I received order updates and shipping information relatively quickly. The product arrived within a week.

NB – this review brings me no profit, I have not been asked to review this product by Creatimber for a discount on my goods. 

Review: Brinton Park

On our little adventures, we have ended up at Brinton Park in Kidderminster.

It’s located just off centre in Kidderminster and as such would be walk-able (under a mile) from the train, or bus, station and is a fun place to meet friends for a picnic and walk. There’s a vast green parkland area and it also has a skate park, tennis court splash pad and play park. There are paths designated for cyclists and pedestrians separately.

 

The parkland was tidy, well kept and clean. And is a great area to walk in, for nature and a safe bit of freedom for the children. The play park was tidy and safe, and the splash pad surprisingly good; having been to various attempts at an outdoor water feature play area, I was impressed by the amount on offer for the children in one splash pad. The water was all shallow, but sloping to go deeper at the one end in order to get a proper “splash when exiting the slide. All in all, rated “Mumma when can we come back?” from the children so… a return is probably on the cards.

 

That doesn’t feel right…

A very unusual thing happened this week… and I felt I needed to write about it. To have it documented in history.

I got to actually relax, not for 5 minutes. Not with a child attached to me. Not trying to do my own thing whilst a child is getting hugged for over an hour… but actually chill out WHILST still parenting.

I ran myself a bath, put in a couple of bath bombs, and told the children they were to play together in each other’s rooms. And they did… for 90 mins. No fighting, no rivalry, none of that whiny crap that you often hear when siblings are doing something remotely competetive; at one point they were definitely playing Frustration, but still all I heard were giggles and “sillys” (it’s what I call the giggly, non-sensical ramblings of children when they are having fun).

And then, when I got out of the bath, I ran them a bath, and got a load of their bath stuff: fizzers, bombs, foam, shower gel, flannels and got them to put swimming kits on and said “do what you want with that but use nothing else”. After 50 minutes of nice, giggly, happy, non-destructive play, it was me that had to end their bath time. Not them, not their behaviour. I was across the landing, again still listening to them, but gave them the space to feel independent. And I just lay on the bed, staring into nothingness.

So although I was still parenting, as in actually listening in, to supervise and intervene where I needed, I was actually relaxing too. I had no idea this could happen, to remain in parenting mode and actually just “chill” for quite an extended period.

It certainly helped make up for some of the sleep deprivation, but it also had the added benefit of increasing my tolerance, patience and self-awareness. I’m not all topped up by any means, but it’s a toe in the water as to what life could become; my children having independence and following some kind of boundaries without intervention, without negative consequences and with purpose, laughter and social skills.

Feeling proud. Feeling accomplished. Feeling hopeful.

Review: Queenswood Country Park and Arboretum

Queenswood is located just off the A49 at Hope under Dinmore, between Hereford and Leominster. There’s a paid car park (around £3 I believe) and a building with a small gift shop, cafe (was cash only, but in the process of being able to accept card payment) and toilet area.

Just to the side of the gift shop is a well equipped play area with a challenge trail and surrounded by picnic tables. The children would literally spend hours here if I left them to it. It is one of the best play parks we have been to (I admit to being a little jealous as they play! hehe).

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Queenswood play area

There are then a few circular walks around the woodland, including a Gruffalo trail, complete with the best known and loved characters. And the walks have various information boards about the wildlife, trees and area, as well as other random additions to the woodland trails such as a wooden xylophone. There’s also a view point with stunning views across the surrounding area (though unfortunately, I get so wrapped up in the beauty each time I forget to take photos).

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Wooden Xylophone

All of the paths I have been on have been wheelchair/pram friendly, and the walks are short and easy enough that even those with low mobility may be able to enjoy at least part of the walks.

Queenswood